Open Letter to the RSPO:

NGO Proposals for the Verification Working Group

Dear Jan Kees Vis,

We are writing to you as NGOs engaged in or observing the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil to urge that greater attention be paid as a matter of priority by the Executive Board of the RSPO to the adoption of an adequate ‘verification’ procedure to ensure compliance by RSPO members with the RSPO standard.

In the last three years, the RSPO has made significant progress. Of note is that the RSPO has:

· through a multi-stakeholder process, adopted a set of Principles, Criteria and Guidance for the production of ‘sustainable palm oil’ which reflects a genuine effort to meet international standards in human rights, the environment and business best practices;

· seen a notable increase in membership, so that the RSPO now includes members from over 1/3rd of the international trade in palm oil;

· adopted a Code of Conduct for members and a reporting procedure designed to encourage step by step compliance with the RSPO standard;

· and (somewhat belatedly) established a Task Force on Smallholders charged with promoting direct engagement of smallholders in the RSPO process and proposing ways of ensuring that RSPO standards and procedures suit smallholder realities.

All this constitutes an encouraging start to the RSPO process.

However, at the same time the growing problems in the palm oil sector remain equally notable. In particular:

· primary forests and forests of high conservation value continue to be cleared with serious consequences for endangered and threatened species, critical habitats and the valuable environmental and social services they provide;

· illegal firing of cleared forests, and of palm debris in existing plantations, continues and is seen to be the main cause of the seasonal regional haze that is closing airports and posing a serious hazard to public health in South East Asia, and is a significant contributor to global CO2 emissions;

· indigenous peoples and local communities continue to be in conflict with plantation companies over the way governments and companies take over their lands for plantations – their rights are ignored, overridden or worse;

· smallholders complain of their poor treatment, low pricing, insecure land tenure, and high debt burdens;

· workers on oil palm estates and mills have protested the low wages and working conditions that they endure, which are often far below the international standards accepted in the RSPO standard;

· workers, especially women sprayers, and smallholders continue to be exposed to dangerous agro-chemicals which the RSPO has agreed should be phased out. However, RSPO members have even lobbied for the lifting of national regulations restricting the use of such chemicals;

· there are continuous reports of human rights abuses related to these impositions, poor practices and the conflicts and subsequent repression that they trigger.

The credibility of the RSPO is thus at stake at RT4 – the fourth RSPO Roundtable. Progress on paper is not being matched by progress on the ground.

Credible verification thus crucial:

The adoption by the RSPO of a credible and workable verification process by which planters and mills can be independently audited and shown to be in compliance with the RSPO standard is thus a vital next step for the RSPO process. Many of us have been observing and making inputs to the Verification Working Group which began work in February and we have the following concerns:

Process:

In the first place we are concerned by the shortcomings in the process of the Verification Working Group, which contrasts markedly with the successful Criteria Working Group, a model that some of us had advocated be followed by the VWG before it was even announced. Whereas the CWG had an adequate budget for meetings, an elected membership, mechanisms to ensure stakeholder representation, agreed procedures for reaching consensus and a series of planned face to face meetings, the VWG seems to lack all these things. It seems to be working on a shoe-string budget with little capacity to sponsor participation by marginal or poorer groups. It works on a ‘whoever turns up’ and ‘whoever emails’ gets to vote basis. There are inadequate provisions to ensure that the concerns of smallholders, communities, indigenous peoples, workers and other marginal groups are represented, in terms of budgetary support or places at the table. It remains unclear what happens if significant stakeholder groups are unhappy with draft texts. Far from seeking to build consensus through face to face meetings, since the February launch the VWG sought to develop a document based only on email inputs. Only when some of us protested the lack of physical meetings were ad hoc meetings hurriedly called to consider stakeholder objections – the first at extremely short notice, the second at the very same time as the Task Force on Smallholders is meeting making participation of a key stakeholder group nigh impossible.

This is all most unfortunate and explains why instead of having a well prepared document for consideration at RT4 we now have a disputed text which is not yet ready for presentation. Below we present what we see as some of the minimum consideration that must be adequately incorporated in the verification procedure.

Minimum Requirements for Verification Procedure:

§ National interpretations must be developed by inclusive and participatory working groups, which should be:

o led by an RSPO member

o include, at a minimum, four RSPO members

o include self-selected spokespeople or representatives from implicated interest groups, notablysocial NGOs, environmental NGOs, smallholders, local communities and/or indigenous peoples and companies

o have voting mechanisms to ensure balance between the interested parties.

§ In the absence of national interpretations, use of the generic standard should be adapted by verifiers to local / national circumstances, through public dissemination and participatory discussion, prior to their use.

§ Units of verification must be chosen so as to discourage ‘greenwashing’ through partial verification

§ RSPO should require adherence to the RSPO criteria by mills closely linked to any plantations seeking RSPO verification

§ Units of verification must be chosen so as to discourage social exclusion of local communities and smallholders. In Indonesia, for example, NES/PIR schemes should be examined as units, meaning that inti and plasma, with associated mills, should all be assessed together.

§ RSPO must make clear what are major and what are minor non-conformities. Lack of compliance with major non-conformities should preclude operations receiving certificates. This should not be left to national interpretations or double standards will probably emerge.

§ RSPO verifiers assess full compliance with the law (including where this is a government responsibility) and not just assess the best efforts of companies to achieve compliance.

§ Verifiers must consult directly with all implicated interest groups – notably indigenous peoples, local communities, smallholders, workers, women and migrants – about all relevant principles and criteria.

§ RSPO should adopt a transparent and credible processing for verifying the ‘chain of custody’, which ensures that consumers can be reassured that the product they buy, stating that it is RSPO compliant, does promote sustainable production.

§ Verifiers should have a credible level of independence of the operations and companies that they are to assess. More detailed instructions are needed about what constitutes a conflict of interest and how long an assessor needs to have maintained independence from a company or family of companies to be considered not to have a conflict of interests (we suggest a minimum of five years).

§ RSPO should require verifiers to adopt an agile procedure for handling complaints and grievances during and after audits. Information about such procedures should be widely disseminated, not just through the web.

§ In addition, RSPO should adopt an agile complaints process so affected parties can take up any outstanding concerns about audits directly with the RSPO.

§ The RSPO develops a credible and transparent process for the control of claims.

§ Additional mechanisms are essential to reduce the costs of audits for smallholders such as simplified audits and group certification.

§ The RSPO should explicitly clarify whether or not ‘phased implementation’ and ‘step-wise certification’ is acceptable or not. If ‘step-wise’ or ‘phased’ approaches are agreed the procedures for such will need to be set out very clearly.

Concluding comments:

The current draft (as at 19th November) remains inadequate with respect to most of the above. Further discussions are therefore needed before a consensus based document can be presented to the Board for approval. We urge that adequate provisions are made as soon as possible for proper, participatory meetings of the VWG including a wide range of stakeholders, in early 2007, so that the text can be finalised. Like you, we are impatient for the RSPO to effect change on the ground, but this must be based on the adoption of an adequate verification procedure, if the RSPO’s credibility is to be maintained.


Yours sincerely

Signed:

Name

Signature

Organisation

Email

Robin Webster

Friends of the Earth

Robin.webster@foeco.uk

Jennifer Mouron

Pesticide Action Network-AP

panap@panap.net

Shannon Coughlin

Rainforest Action Network

shannon@ran.org

Frances Carr

Down to Earth

dte@gn.apc.org

Paul Wolvekamp

Both Ends

pw@bothends.org

Serge Marti

Lifemosaic

serge@lifemosaic.org

Johan Verburg

Oxfam International

Johan.verburg@oxfam.nl

Rudy Lumuru

SawitWatch

rudy@sawitwatch.or.id

Koesnadi

PADI Indonesia

Basap.indo@gmail.com

AH Semendawai

ELSAM

ahwai@elsam.or.id

Cion Alexander

SPKS

Laili Khairnur

Lembaga Gemawan

gemawan@telkom.net

Sahat Lumbauraja

KDS-Medan

Pkps_medan@yahoo.com

Zulfanmi

Jikalahari

Z#aumie@jikalahari.org

Syarhul

PEMA Paser

pema@telkom.net

Marcus Colchester

Forest Peoples Programme

marcus@forestpeoples.org

Mina Susana Setra

AMA Kalbar

Surat Terbuka kepada RSPO:

Beberapa Usulan NGO untuk Kelompok Kerja Verfikasi

Yang terhormat Jan Kees Vis,

Kami menyampaikan kepada anda sebagai Ornop yang terlibat didalam atau memantau Pertemuan tentang Minyak Sawit Berkelanjutan mendesak bahwa perhatian besar diberikan sebagai masalah utama oleh Badan Pengurus RSPO untuk penerapan sebuah prosedur ‘verifikasi’ yang memadai untuk memastikan pemenuhan oleh anggota RSPO terhadap standar RSPO.

Dalam 3 tahun terakhir, RSPO telah membuat perkembangan yang signifikan. Yang menjadi catatan bahwa RSPO telah:

· Melalui sebuah proses parapihak, menerima Prinsip, Kriterian dan Pedoman untuk produksi ‘minyak sawit berkelanjutan’ yang menunjukan suatu upaya nyata untuk mencapai standar internasional dalam hak asasi manusia, lingkungan dan tata kelola terbaik dunia usaha;

· Memandang pertumbuhan dalam keanggotaan, sehingga RSPO memasukan anggota dari 1/3rd dari perdagangan internasional dalam minyak sawit;

· Menerapkan sebuah Aturan Perilaku untuk anggota dan prosedur pelaporan yang disusun untuk mendorong pemenuhan bertahap standar RSPO;

· Dan (walaupun agak terlambat) membentuk sebuah Kelompok Kerja Petani (Task Force on Smallholders) yang diberikan tugas untuk mendorong pelibatan langsung petani dalam proses-proses RSPO dan memberikan usulan cara-cara untuk memastikan bahwa standar dan prosedur RSPO sesuai dengan kenyataan petani.

Semua hal tersebut menjadi suatu awal yang menggembirakan atas proses RSPO.

Namun, pada saat yang sama masalah-masalah dalam sektor minyak sawit masih terus terjadi. Khususnya:

· hutan primer dan hutan bernilai konservasi tinggi ditebang dengan berbagai dampak bagi hewan langka dan terancam punah, habitat penting dan lingkungan tak ternilai serta jasa sosial yang hutan sediakan:

· pembakaran tidak syah terhadap hutan tebangan, dan sampah sawit dalam perkebunan yang ada, terus dan dipandang menjadi penyebab utama asap musiman regional yang menutup beberapa bandar udara dan mendatangkan bahaya serius terhadap kesehatan masyarakat di Asia Tenggara, adalah penyumbang utama bagi emisi CO2;

· masyarakat adat dan komunitas setempat terus-menerus berkonflik dengan perusahaan perkebunan atas cara pemerintah dan perusahaan mengambil-alih tanah-tanah mereka untuk perkebunan – hak-hak mereka diabaikan, ditolak atau lebih parah;

· para petani mengeluh atas perlakuan buruk, harga buah rendah, hak kelola atas tanah tidak aman dan beban utang tinggi;

· para pekerja dalam perkebunan kelapa sawit dan pabrik telah menyampaikan keberatan tentang upah rendah dan kondisi kerja yang terus mereka alami, seringkali jauh dibawah standar internasional yang diterima dalam standar RSPO;

· para pekerja, khususnya perempuan penyemprot, dan petani terus-menerus terpapar oleh bahan kimia pertanian yang disepakati oleh RSPO secara bertahan dihentikan untuk digunakan. Namun, anggota RSPO justru telah meminta untuk dicabutnya peraturan nasional yang melarang penggunaan bahan-bahan kimia sejenisnya;

· masih saja ada laporan-laporan tentang pelanggaran hak asasi manusia berkaitan dengan tindakan pemaksaan, perbuatan buruk dan konflik serta tindakan kekerasan yang disebabkannya.

Oleh karena itu kredibilitas RSPO benar-benar dipertaruhkan pada RT4 – Roundtable keempat ini. Perkembangan diatas kertas justru tidak diselaraskan dengan perkembangan di lapangan.

Karena verifikasi yang dapat dipercaya sangat penting:

Penerapan oleh RSPO suatu proses verifikasi yang dapat dipercaya dan berkerja dimana perusahaan dan pabrik dapat secara mandiri diaudit serta menunjukan pemenuhan standar RSPO merupakan sebuah langkah selanjutnya yang sangat penting untuk proses RSPO. Banyak diantara kita telah memantau dan memberikan masukan kepada Kelompok Kerja Verifikasi yang mulai berkerja pada bulan Februari dan kami mengkhawatirkan beberapa hal berikut ini:

Proses:

Ditempat pertama kami sangat dikhawatirkan oleh berbagai kekurangan dalam proses Kelompok Kerja Verifikasi, yang sangat jauh berbeda dengan proses Kelompok Kerja Kriteria, sebuah model dimana beberapa diantara kita telah terlibat mendukung yang juga mengikuti Kelompok Kerja Verifikasi (VWG) bahkan sebelum diumumkan. Kelompok Kerja Kriteria (CWG) punya dana cukup untuk pertemun-pertemuan, keanggotaan terpilih, tata cara untuk memastikan keterwakilan, prosedur untuk mencapai consensus serta rangkaian rencana pertemuan tatap muka, Kelompok Kerja Verifikasi (VWG) kelihatannya tidak melalui langkah rangkaian serupa. Sepertinya VWG berkerja dalam ‘anggaran terbatas’ dengan sedikit kapasitas untuk mendanai partisipasi kelompok marjinal atau kelompok-kelompok paling miskin. VWG berkerja dalam mendapatkan suara ‘siapapun yang siap’ dan ‘email siapapun’. Kurangnya ketentuan untuk memastikan bahwa permasalahan petani sawit (smallholders), berbagai komunitas, masyarakat adat, pekerja dan kelompok marjinal lainnya terwakili, dalam hal dukungan pendanaan atau dibahas bersama. Masih belum jelas apa yang akan terjadi bila parapihak dari kelompok-kelompok penting tidak puas dengan naskah teks. Jauh dari upaya membangun consensus melalui pertemuan tatap muka, sejak peluncuran VWG bulan Februari lebih memilih untuk mengembangkan suatu dokumen berdasarkan masukan-masukan melalui email. Hanya ketika beberapa diantara kita mengajukan keberatan atas kurangnya pertemuan fisik, lalu rapat-rapat ad hoc mendadak disuarakan untuk mempertimbangkan penolakan parapihak – yang pertama benar-benar mendadak, kedua bersamaan dengan pertemuan Kelompok Kerja Petani (Task Force on Smallholders) sedang mengadakan pertemuan sehingga partisipasi dari kelompok parapihak kunci sangat mustahil dilakukan.

Semua ini sangat tidak menguntungkan dan sekaligus menjelaskan mengapa bukannya mempersiapkan suatu dokumen dengan matang untuk pertimbangan, pada RT4 sekarang justru kita memiliki teks yang disengketakan sama sekali tidak siap untuk presentasi. Dibawah ini kami sampaikan apa yang menurut kami sebagai pertimbangan minimum yang harus dimasukan didalam prosedur verifikasi.

Persyaratan Minimum untuk Prosedur Verifikasi:

§ Penafsiran nasional harus dikembangkan melalui kelompok kerja yang terbuka dan partisipatif, yang semestinya:

o Dipimpin oleh satu anggota RSPO

o Memasukan, paling tidak 4mpat anggota RSPO

o Memasukan orang yang mengajukan diri atau perwakilan dari kelompok kepentingan terkena dampak, seperti NGO sosial dan lingkungan petani, komunitas setempat dan/atau masyarakat adat serta perusahaan

o Memiliki tata cara voting untuk memastikan keseimbangan antara pihak berkepentingan.

§ Dimana penafsiran nasional belum ada, gunakan standar umum harus diterapkan oleh pihak yang melakukan pembuktian (verifier) terhadap keadaan setempat/nasional, melalui diseminasi umum dan pembahasan partisipatif, sebelum digunakan.

§ Unit-unit verifikasi harus dipilih sehingga menghindari ‘pencucian-hijau’ melalui verifikasi sebagian.

§ RSPO seharusnya mewajibkan pematuhan kriteria RSPO oleh pabrik-pabrik yang terkait dengan perkebunan yang mengupayakan verifikasi RSPO

§ Unit-unit verifikasi harus dipilih sehingga menghindari pengabaian sosial terhadap komunitas lokal dan petani sawit. Di Indonesia, misalnya pola PIR seharusnya diperiksa sebagai unit-unit, yang berarti bahwa inti dan plasma, dengan pabrik-pabrik yang bersangkutan, harus dikaji secara bersama.

§ RSPO harus membuat perbedaan yang jelas antara apa itu tidak sesuai mayor dan tidak sesuai mayor. Kurangnya pemenuhan ketidakpatuhan utama seharusnya membatasi perusahaan untuk tidak diberikan sertifikat. Hal ini seharusnya tidak diserahkan pada penafsiran nasional atau mungkin standar ganda akan muncul.

§ Pelaksana pembuktian RSPO menilai pemenuhan utuh terhadap hukum (termasuk dimana hal tersebut merupakan tanggung jawab pemerintah) dan tidak hanya menilai upaya-upaya terbaik oleh perusahaan untuk mencapai pemenuhan.

§ Pelaksana pembuktian harus konsultasi langsung dengan semua kelompok terkait kepentingan – khususnya masyarakat adat, komunitas local, petani sawit, pekerja, perempuan dan migran – tentang semua prinsip dan kriteria terkait.

§ RSPO harus menerapkan proses yang transparan dan dapat dipercaya untuk pembuktian ‘lacak sawit’, yang memastikan bahwa konsumen dapat diyakinkan bahwa produk yang mereka beli, dinyatakan memenuhi RSPO, benar-benar mendorong produksi berkelanjutan.

§ Pelaksana pembuktian harus memiliki tingkat kepercayaan independensi dari operasional dan perusahaan yang mereka nilai. Instruksi lebih terperinci diperlukan tentang apa yang dimaksud dengan konflik kepentingan dan ­berapa lama seorang penilai wajib menjaga independensi dari sebuah perusahaan atau keluarga dari perusahaan-perusahaan dianggap tidak termasuk dalam konflik kepentingan (kami menyarankan minimum 5 tahun).

§ RSPO harus mewajibkan pelaksana pembuktian untuk menerapkan suatu prosedur tanggap untuk menangani laporan dan pelanggaran selama dan setelah audit. Keterangan mengenai prosedur-prosedur serupa harus diedarkan, tidak hanya melalui web.

§ Sebagai tambahan, RSPO harus menerapkan sebuah proses laporan yang tanggap sehingga para pihak terkena dampak dapat menyampaikan permasalahan lainnya tentang audit langsung dengan RSPO.

§ RSPO mengembangkan suatu proses yang transparan dan dapat dipercaya untuk kontrol terhadap pernyataan.

§ Beberapa tata-cara tambahan penting untuk mengurangi biaya audit bagi petani kecil misalnya penyederhanaan audit dan sertifikasi kelompok.

§ RSPO harus secara tegas menjelaskan apakah ‘implementasi bertahap’ dan ‘sertifikasi perlangkah’ diterima atau tidak. Jika pendekatan ‘perlangkah’ atau ‘bertahap’ disepakati maka prosedur semacam ini akan perlu ditetapkan dengan sangat jelas.

Catatan kesimpulan:

Naskah terbaru (pada 19 November) masih kurang memadai berkaitan dengan hal-hal diatas. Oleh karena itu, pembahasan lebih lanjut diperlukan sebelum sebuah konsensus berdasarkan dokumen dapat disampaikan kepada Dewan Pengurus RSPO untuk pengesahan. Kami mendesak berbagai ketentuan memadai dibuat secepat mungkin supaya lebih baik, pertemuan partisipatif VWG termasuk parapihak seluas-luasnya, pada awal 2007, sehingga naskah tersebut dapat diselesaikan. Seperti anda, kami juga tidak sabar terhadap RSPO untuk segera berdampak terhadap perubahan dilapangan, tetapi hal ini harus berdasarkan pada penerapan atas suatu prosedur pembuktian yang memadai, jika kredibilitas RSPO tetap dijaga.


hormat kami

Ditandatangani:

Name

Signature

Organisation

Email

Robin Webster

Friends of the Earth

Robin.webster@foeco.uk

Jennifer Mouron

Pesticide Action Network-AP

panap@panap.net

Shannon Coughlin

Rainforest Action Network

shannon@ran.org

Frances Carr

Down to Earth

dte@gn.apc.org

Paul Wolvekamp

Both Ends

pw@bothends.org

Serge Marti

Lifemosaic

serge@lifemosaic.org

Johan Verburg

Oxfam International

Johan.verburg@oxfam.nl

Rudy Lumuru

SawitWatch

rudy@sawitwatch.or.id

Koesnadi

PADI Indonesia

Basap.indo@gmail.com

AH Semendawai

ELSAM

ahwai@elsam.or.id

Cion Alexander

SPKS

Laili Khairnur

Lembaga Gemawan

gemawan@telkom.net

Sahat Lumbauraja

KPS-Medan

Pkps_medan@yahoo.com

Zulfanmi

Jikalahari

Z#aumie@jikalahari.org

Syarhul

PEMA Paser

pema@telkom.net

Marcus Colchester

Forest Peoples Programme

marcus@forestpeoples.org

Mina Susana Setra

AMA Kalbar

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *